Results tagged ‘ Paul Molitor ’

Former Media/Staff Lot to Be Renamed in Honor of Johnny Logan

To day we announced that we will rename the media/staff parking lot at Miller Park in honor of former Milwaukee Braves All-Star shortstop Johnny Logan.  Logan was inducted into the Brewers Walk of Fame last season.

The “Logan Lot” joins 12 other parking lots around Miller Park that were renamed prior to the 2010 season in honor of some of the city’s baseball legends.  The lots are adorned with the names of former Milwaukee Brewers and Braves players, with banners and other artwork notating the baseball greats. Uniformed members of the Brewers and Braves Walk of Fame are represented, with the first 12 parking lots named after Henry Aaron, Cecil Cooper, Rollie Fingers, Jim Gantner, Harvey Kuenn, Eddie Mathews, Paul Molitor, Don Money, Warren Spahn, Gorman Thomas, Bob Uecker and Robin Yount.

Logan played in Milwaukee from 1953 – 1961 and appeared in four All-Star Games as a member of the Braves.  For his 13-year career, Logan hit .268 with 93 home runs and 547 RBI.  He was a member of the Braves World Series Championship team in 1957 and the National League Championship team in 1958.  Logan was signed by the Boston Braves in 1947 and made his Major League debut with Boston in 1951.  After playing in Milwaukee, he played three seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Logan, a former area scout with the Brewers, passed away on August 9, 2013.

-John & Cait

JohnandCait@brewers.com

Good Luck to Brewers Fan & Olympian Erika Brown on the #RoadtoSochi!

The first time Erika Brown made the U.S. Olympic Curling team, guys like Paul Molitor, Robin Yount, and Juan Nieves graced the Brewers roster.  

It was 1988 and the then 15-year-old was headed to Calgary for the XV Olympic Winter Games where curling would debut as a demonstration sport.

It’s now 2013 and Erika, a lifelong Brewers fan and Wisconsin native, is on the road to Sochi, hoping for the chance to compete in her third Olympics in a sport that’s always been a family affair.

Originally from Madison, Wisconsin, Erika began curling in 1980 at the age of 7, taking after her mom, dad and brother, who all played the sport.

“In 1988, I remember being there with my family. My parents were there. My dad was our coach and my mom was our alternate on our team. The ceremonies were overwhelming,” she reminisced.

Erika made her second trip to the Olympics 10 years later, in Nagano in 1998.

“I think in 1998, we all were more experienced. We had different expectations. We had competed at that time for 10 years on a world stage. Nagano was great. Curling had gained more recognition and popularity by that time. There was great fan support and fun crowds. It was amazing!”

Erika’s team won the Women’s Curling Championship in Green Bay earlier this year, which qualified them for the Olympic Team Trials. And it felt extra special that it happened in her home state in front of family and friends.

“There were lots of Wisconsin curling fans there and it was fun to be in such a fun sporting town, too. We were right near Lambeau Field.”

Erika Brown

Erika Brown

The Olympian also adds accomplished golfer to her resume—she was the Wisconsin State High School champ in 1990 and 1991 and twice the City of Madison women’s champion as well.

“I don’t get a chance to play as much as I want to anymore, but golf is a great compliment to curling. There are a lot of similarities—repetitive motion, timing, strategy,” Erika said.

Although Erika has since moved to Ontario with her husband (a three-time World Champion curler himself) and children, she’s still a Brewers fan at heart and follows the team from afar.

“Growing up, we were always Brewers fans.  We were members of the Brewers Fan Club, the year they won the pennant, in 1982. I remember my dad would get home at 5pm and we would get in our van. We’d stop to get pizza and eat it on the drive to Milwaukee for the games. We went to 17 games that season, we were all into it.”

In addition to curling and golf, Erika was well versed in many other sports growing up, including little league.

“I played infield, so I tried to emulate Robin Yount,” she said with a laugh.

Gorman Thomas was her favorite player and Erika even has photos of herself with Stormin’ Gorman and many of the members of that ’82 team from a Kids Picture Day that season:

And, although she didn’t make it to any playoff games, she says she also has a photo from the night the Brewers won the pennant.

“It’s one of my favorite photos. My brother and I have all of our gear on the night they won the pennant and we’re in our living room, celebrating,” she said.

So, while Erika continues to cheer on the Brewers, we’ll continue to cheer on her and the other Olympic hopefuls on the road to Sochi.

Erika’s next stop is North Dakota for the Olympic Team Trials, Sunday, November 10 through Sunday, November 17.

“With Curling, it’s such a combination of skills. Fitness has become a really integral part of the game. As a skip [Editor’s Note: The skip is the captain of the team, responsible for determining strategy], what I love is how strategic and cerebral it is and the experience is a huge factor. Having played for so long, that’s helpful and that’s why I like the position I play and the strategy that goes into the game. The other great thing is my teammates. We all work together and lift each other up. For me it’s created friendships and lifelong bonds.”

We already know Brewers fans are everywhere—and we hope there’s one more in Sochi next February.

-Cait

JohnandCait@brewers.com

Carlos Gomez Named Milwaukee Brewers Nominee for 2013 Hank Aaron Award

Major League Baseball and MLB Advanced Media announced that Carlos Gomez was named the Milwaukee Brewers nominee for the 2013 Hank Aaron Award.

Fans can vote exclusively online at MLB.com and the 30 Club sites. For the fourth straight year, a special panel of Hall of Fame players led by Hank Aaron will join fans in voting for the award, which is officially sanctioned by Major League Baseball and has recognized the most outstanding offensive performer in each League since it was established in 1999.

Gomez batted .284 with 27 doubles, 10 triples, 24 home runs, 73 RBI and 40 stolen bases (all career highs) in 147 games. The speedy center fielder was selected to his first All-Star Game and ranked among the National League leaders in triples (T2nd), stolen bases (4th), slugging percentage (7th, .506) and extra-base hits (T8th, 61). Gomez, who was the only player in the Major Leagues this season with 20+ HR and 35+ SB, became the first player in franchise history with 20+ HR and 40+ SB in a season.  He led the Brewers in doubles, home runs, extra-base hits, total bases (271) and slugging percentage and tied for the team-lead in runs (80) and triples.  In addition, his 12 assists ranked second among Major League center fielders in 2013.

Gomez MLB Instagram

The Hall of Fame panel led by Aaron includes some of the greatest offensive players of all-time –Roberto Alomar, Johnny Bench, Tony Gwynn, Paul Molitor, Eddie Murray and Robin Yount.  These Hall of Famers – who combined for 17,629 hits, 8,278 RBI and 1,723 home runs – have all been personally selected by Hank Aaron to lend their expertise to select the best offensive performer in each League.

Through October 10, fans will have the opportunity to select one American League and one National League winner from a list comprising of one finalist per Club. The winners of the 2013 Hank Aaron Award will be announced during the 2013 World Series.

“It is a great honor that Major League Baseball recognizes the most outstanding offensive performer in each League with an award in my name,” said Hank Aaron. “The game is full of so many talented players today that I am thankful my fellow Hall of Famers and the fans assist in selecting the much deserving winners.”

The finalists for the 2013 Hank Aaron Award are:

American League National League
Baltimore Orioles Chris Davis Arizona Diamondbacks Paul Goldschmidt
Boston Red Sox David Ortiz Atlanta Braves Freddie Freeman
Chicago White Sox Alexei Ramirez Chicago Cubs Nate Schierholtz
Cleveland Indians Jason Kipnis Cincinnati Reds Jay Bruce
Detroit Tigers Miguel Cabrera Colorado Rockies Michael Cuddyer
Houston Astros Jason Castro Los Angeles Dodgers Hanley Ramirez
Kansas City Royals Eric Hosmer Miami Marlins Giancarlo Stanton
LA Angels of Anaheim Mike Trout Milwaukee Brewers Carlos Gomez
Minnesota Twins Joe Mauer New York Mets David Wright
New York Yankees Robinson Cano Philadelphia Phillies Domonic Brown
Oakland Athletics Josh Donaldson Pittsburgh Pirates Andrew McCutchen
Seattle Mariners Kendrys Morales St. Louis Cardinals Matt Carpenter
Tampa Bay Rays Evan Longoria San Diego Padres Will Venable
Texas Rangers Adrian Beltre San Francisco Giants Hunter Pence
Toronto Blue Jays Edwin Encarnacion Washington Nationals Jayson Werth

Past winners of the Hank Aaron Award include: Miguel Cabrera and Buster Posey (2012), Jose Bautista and Matt Kemp (2011), Bautista and Joey Votto (2010); Derek Jeter and Albert Pujols (2009); Aramis Ramirez and Kevin Youkilis (2008); Alex Rodriguez and Prince Fielder (2007); Jeter and Ryan Howard (2006); David Ortiz and Andruw Jones (2005); Manny Ramirez and Barry Bonds (2004); Rodriguez and Pujols (2003); Rodriguez and Bonds (2001-02); Carlos Delgado and Todd Helton (2000) and Manny Ramirez and Sammy Sosa (1999).

The Hank Aaron Award was introduced in 1999 to honor the 25th Anniversary of Aaron breaking Babe Ruth’s all-time home run record, and, at that time, was the first major award introduced by Major League Baseball in more than 25 years.  

-John and Cait

JohnandCait@brewers.com

Louisville Slugger Museum and Factory Brings Baseball History to Miller Park

Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory “hits” the road with a traveling interactive experience created for Milwaukee’s Miller Park this weekend.  The exhibits can be found down the first base line on the Field Level and next to the Right Field foul pole.

The mobile museum will feature and number of Brewers related items including:

Hank Aaron’s 700th Home Run Bat

Fans will be able to see the bat Hank Aaron used to hit his 700th home run on July 21, 1973.

The bat Hank Aaron used for his 700th home run.

The bat Hank Aaron used for his 700th home run.

This A99 model ash bat is 35-inches and 32-ounces, and is one of the significant treasures in the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory collection. The bat is also signed by Aaron.

Hank Aaron

Hank Aaron

“Hold a Piece of History” With Bats Used By Robin Yount, Paul Molitor, Geoff Jenkins, Rickie Weeks

A favorite with the crowds, “Hold a Piece of History” allows fans to hold bats that were actually used by major league players.  For Milwaukee fans, Louisville Slugger Museum  Factory will give fans the chance to hold and pose with bats used by Robin Yount, Paul Molitor, Geoff Jenkins and Rickie Weeks.

 Roberto Clemente Game Used Bat

With the Brewers hosting Pittsburgh, an extra treat for fans will feature a legend with the Pirates, Roberto Clemente.  His U1 model ash bat from 1969-1970 will be on display. The bat is 36-inches long and weighs 34-ounces.

Bat Making Demonstrations

Louisville Slugger has been making baseball bats since 1884.  Another highlight of the mobile museum includes a fascinating hand-turning lathe demonstration that shows the “old-fashioned” way of carving bats by hand, using the same tools that date back to the 1800s.

Sign Ups for Free Museum Passes and Other Prizes

The Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory is located in downtown Louisville, Kentucky – less than 7 hours by car from Milwaukee. Louisville is a great weekend getaway, and fans will be able to sign up for free passes to the museum and other prizes.

“We’re looking forward to a fun weekend of baseball with the great fans of the Brewers. Our team has put together an interactive experience customized especially for this Milwaukee versus Pittsburgh series,” said Anne Jewell, Executive Director at Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory.  “Rarely do we display these artifacts outside of the museum and we encourage Milwaukee’s baseball fans to join us at Miller Park over the holiday weekend,” she said.

Visitors can experience history-in-the-making as you stroll through the factory where world-famous Louisville Slugger bats are created. Award-winning factory tour, newly renovated galleries with interactive exhibits, historic memorabilia, the World’s Biggest Bat, and more. Create a Louisville Slugger bat with your very own name on it, just like the pros. Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory, 800 West Main Street, is open Monday – Saturday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.  Admission is $11 for adults, $10 for seniors (60+), $6 children (6-12), and free for children 5 and under.  For more information, log on to sluggermuseum.com  or call 502-588-7228.

Come see a piece of history at Miller Park this weekend and then make plans to head to Louisville to see the real thing!

–JOHN

johnandcait@brewers.com

Well-Equipped: There is No Offseason for Tony Migliaccio

Tony Migliaccio sure knows his way around the clubhouse.

And he should. He’s the Director of Clubhouse Operations and the
Equipment Manager
for the Club and he’s played an integral role in the
clubhouse since Opening Day of 1978, when he started as a batboy and
clubhouse attendant for the visiting side of things.

“It was Paul Molitor‘s first game for the Brewers. I always look back
and kind of laugh that at the time, Molitor made the team and started
the season as shortstop, nobody had really heard of him. Robin [Yount] had some
health issues so he didn’t start on Opening Day, but Molitor did. There
was a picture in the paper back then of Molitor making a play and there
I was, the ball boy down the left-field line, just sitting there, you
know? His first day and mine,” Tony recalls.


1978 2.JPG
The 1978 Milwaukee Brewers Team Photo. Tony is
third from the left in the bottom row.   Paul Molitor is second from the
right in the fourth row.




The next season, Tony switched over to the home clubhouse, where he was a
batboy and a clubhouse attendant three more years before he became the
clubhouse assistant to then Equipment Manager, Bob Sullivan for
approximately four years. When Bob passed away, Tony was given the head
job as Director of Clubhouse Operations and Equipment Manager and he’s
had that ever since.

MigliaccioT06RS002.jpg

Tony Migliaccio as Director of Clubhouse Operations & Equipment Manager.



Tony describes his role as having dual responsibilities:

“You work as the Equipment Manager and in that role, you order all the
equipment the players need to play the game–bats, balls, shoes, clothes, etc. On the
other side of it, we manage and operate the clubhouse, running the
day-to-day operations of that.That part of the job entails clothing
them and providing another service by feeding them breakfast, lunch and
dinner. We do what we can to get them on the field. Everyone has a role.
The trainers’ role is to keep them healthy on the field, the coaches’
job is to teach. Here, we keep a nice house, clothe them, feed them and
make sure they’re happy, play the game and have a good time.
” he
explained.

“I think everyday is unique. That’s kind of the neat part of it. You can
come in here and every day there is a different challenge or need. Our
role is to make the guys as comfortable as possible. They have enough
hurdles in the game, on the field, and so many other things going on
around them in their lives that we try to make it as comfortable for
them as we can and to create an enjoyable environment.”

Tony and I talked about the change in the uniforms over the years. As
time has progressed, the uniform specifications have gotten a little
more complicated, keeping Tony and his staff on their toes.

“You look at the guys on the field now and compare it to the late 1980s,
where it was all just cookie cutter- you know, 34″ waist pants and a
44″ jersey. Now we’ve got many options, for example, pants can be open
bottom, or more tapered. Some players may wear things bigger,
looser…The marketing of the game has changed as such that there is a
lot more variety–a couple of different jackets, a couple different
jerseys.”

Tony told me that the team never had BP tops in the 80s, they just wore
game jerseys. Now in essence, there are six different jerseys and each
player has to have more than one as a backup in case something happens.
When you multiply that times a 25-man roster, plus a few guys that Tony
knows will move up and down in the organization due to injuries,
pitching, etc. that he’ll also need to carry uniforms and equipment for,
you can see he has quite a bit to handle and monitor for inventory.

And, when it comes to Spring Training when a team has such a large roster, you can imagine that Tony is a very busy man.

“In Spring Training you are doing a lot of the same things as you would
during the regular season, but you have twice as many players. We have
53 players here now and we’ll leave here with 25. So that’s the
difference with Spring Training, the magnitude, more people to take care
of, more to feed, more to clothe, more equipment to provide,
” Tony
said.

Tony remembers years ago when it seemed like Spring Training was looked
upon as the time that players would use to get in shape. They’d come
down to camp, play 20 games and then go back ready to start the season.
It was much lower key and the days were shorter.

“Now,” Tony said, “Players come down in shape, we play 30 games and
there are more services required. Sometimes, there are two games a day.
It is a little more intense than it used to be.”

“I have been fortunate that I’ve worked in all three facilities that
we’ve been in: Sun City, Chandler and here in Maryvale.You look at the
progression, even just in our area, at the space we’ve had and what
we’ve provided. In Sun City, we had a very tiny equipment room, but you
made it work, you adjusted things. We didn’t provide as much stuff for
the guys. Then we moved to Chandler and it was a little bigger, but now
we have this space, which is twice as big and we’ve already outgrown it
into renting storage facilities to house a lot of the equipment,” Tony
said.

P1010878.JPG

Here is just one area of Tony’s equipment room at Maryvale Baseball Park.


Just like the rest of us, there is no offseason for Tony Migliaccio and
his staff. 

Starting in January, trucks will leave Milwaukee bringing
everything down to set up for camp. Tony and his staff will arrive, help
take part in the Brewers Fantasy Camp, work through Spring Training and
then travel back to Milwaukee for Opening Day and play through the
summer. Then when all the games are done, while their hours are a little
more regular and they have weekends free, they still have to prepare
for the following year, taking inventory, working on the budget, and
planning.

Tony also travels with the team.

“I do 90% of the travel. I made every trip for probably about 15 or 16
years and then, 10 to12 years ago, we started breaking up the trips a
little bit so Visiting Clubhouse Manager Phil Rozewicz or Home Clubhouse
Assistant Jason Shawger
will make a trip or two. Out of Spring
Training, I will pretty much stay with the team throughout the first
month of April and wait until the middle or end of May to take a trip
off to stay at home, catch up in the office and at home,” Tony said.

In his job, Tony also has to be prepared for anything.

“When we travel throughout the year, part of our extra equipment stock
is carrying blank jerseys and numbers, everything you need to make a
jersey. In each city, we have a reciprocal relationship with the
visiting clubhouse staff that take care of us. They have a seamstress on
hand that they work with so if we get into San Diego late one night and
Vice President-Assistant General Manager Gord Ash calls and says ‘Hey,
we’re bringing up so-and-so,’ I can get to the park early that morning,
pull out everything I need, call our contact, have them come out and put
our jersey together within a couple hours,” he explained.

“Knock on wood, we’ve always got it there in time. I have heard there
have been situations with some teams where they make a move so quickly
that they have to have a player wear a jersey with another name on the
back just to get out there on the field. We’ve been lucky where its
worked out. That’s one great thing about Majestic Athletic being the
licensee and having all of the team for uniforms–they have a good bank
of knowledge as to everyone’s sizes.”

Tony takes extra precautions to be prepared and make sure he’s ready for
anything. When it became likely that we would make the trade for CC
Sabathia
in 2008, it was Fourth of July weekend and he knew that
Majestic shuts down for the holidays. Knowing CC’s size and that he had
such unique specs on his gear, Tony took the initiative to order his
uniforms the week before, to have them on hand just in case.

“I figured hey, you know what, if we don’t make the trade, it will be a collector’s item. It all worked out,” he recalled.

Speaking of 2008,  making the Postseason that year ranks in the top 10 of Tony’s favorite memories in his time with the Club.

“It pretty neat, the way it came down to the last day.The way it played out was pretty cool,” he said.

“I was also fortunate to be around during the World Series in the early
’80s. I was a young kid then,” Tony said. “Molitor’s 39-game hitting
streak
was pretty neat, Robin’s 3000th hit, 1987, that whole start of
winning 13 in a row, Nieves throwing a no-hitter. That was a pretty
unique thing, to start off that hot,” he said.

It was great catching up with Tony and taking a tour of his world, but
with his phone buzzing during our interview and guys stopping him along
the way, I knew I had to let him get back to work.

Here’s to hoping the 2011 season makes Tony’s list of favorite memories!

-CAIT
johnandcait@brewers.com

Brewers Team Store by Majestic Offers Fans Opportunity For Free Brewers Yearbook

As the Brewers 40th Anniversary season winds down, the Brewers Team Store by Majestic at Miller Park is offering fans a great opportunity for a great keepsake.  Beginning tomorrow, fans spending $75 or more at the Brewers Team Store by Majestic will receive a copy of the 2010 Brewers Yearbook absolutely FREE.  The regular retail price is $10.

If you haven’t already picked up your copy of the book, this is a great opportunity.  My colleague Ken Spindler, Brewers Coordinator of Media Relations spent many long hours making sure this was the best Brewers year book ever.  Meredith Malone, Brewers Communications and Brewers Community Foundation Coordinator, served as co-editor for the book. 

Dennis Sell, part of the Miller Park Gamenight Scoreboard Crew and collector of all things Brewers history, provided a lot of insight on the historical perspective.  Sell has an amazing collection of Brewers artifacts and was instrumental in helping me get the Brewers Museum at Brewers On Deck together.  Mario Ziino, former Brewers Public Relations Director was also on the team that made the 40th Anniversary Yearbook a true collector’s item.

“We really wanted to capture a lot of the history with it being the 40th Anniversary of the team,” Spindler said.  “Looking back, this is the most extensive and complete Brewers yearbook to date.  We included every Brewers team photo which will make for many great memories from all Brewers fans.”

The 2010 yearbook has around 180 pages of articles, photos and other Brewers information–50 more pages than last year.  In addition to the historical element of the yearbook, it includes photos of the current team and photos of every player in the Brewers Minor League system–from Rookie Ball through the Big Leagues.  A number of articles about current players as well as the Brewers Farm System are also included in the yearbook.

Much like we did with the 2010 Brewers Media Guide, the 2010 Brewers Yearbook includes a spread with pictures of every previous Brewers Yearbook cover.  The cover of the 2010 Brewers Yearbook features a collage of Brewers past and present including George Pollard drawings of Robin Yount, Paul Molitor, Hank Aaron and Rollie Fingers

2010 Brewers Yearbook cover.jpgSpeaking of the Brewers Team Store by Majestic, remember that the new shipment of Trevor Hoffman 600 Saves t-shirts is scheduled to arrive tomorrow.  If you already picked up your voucher, you can redeem that beginning on Monday at Miller Park.  Keep in mind that these shirts are ONLY available at the Brewers Team Store by Majestic at Miller Park and will not be sold online or at any other retailers.

In addition, a series of limited edition “600 Saves” Lithographs are being produced and will be available for purchase in the Team Store. Fewer than 150 will be available to the public.  The Lithograph is the same artwork that was presented to Hoffman by the Brewers to recognize the 600th save. The painting was created by noted artist Janet Olney.  There will be only 51 copies (representing his uniform number) autographed and numbered by Trevor Hoffman (unframed are $250 each; framed are $500).  Only 60 prints not autographed and not framed ($25 each) will also be available.

–JOHN

johnandcait@brewers.com

 

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